Blade Runner faces up to busiest Paralympics yet | SASCOC - SASCOC

Blade Runner faces up to busiest Paralympics yet

By Mark Etheridge in London

Oscar Pistorius may be many things to many people but he is most certainly not an illusionist when it comes to his track exploits.

Lining up for his third Paralympic Games, Pistorius has his most hectic schedule yet when he tackles four track events ÔÇô the 100-metre sprint, 200m, 400m and 4x100m relay.

The double-leg amputee who will be Team South Africa’s flagbearer at Wednesday night’s opening ceremony, won three golds in those first three events at the 2008 Paralympics in Beijing but four years down the line he is under no illusion as to the task that awaits him.

“Since Beijing I’ve lost 11kg and I have certainly shifted more to a 400m runner so the 100m will be the biggest challenge for me here in London,” said Pistorius at an international press conference at the Main Press Centre in Olympic Park on Tuesday.

“There are probably about six guys in the 100m that could win it on the day. The 100m is always the hottest ticket at the Olympics and Paralympics… whether it be on the track or in the pool.

“It’s always hugely close. In Athens 2004 I was third by less than 0.10sec and in Beijing I won by 0.03sec.

“So to be realistic I’ll be very happy with a top three, I’m aiming at a medal. Sure, I’d love to defend my 100m title but I just think I have moved away from the 100m right now.”

Having said that though, and Pistorius is impressed with the way his body has reacted to a different training regime since he reached the semi-finals of the Olympics Games here.

“My coach, Ampie Louw, and I have have now moved on to heavier weights and more speedwork to help me in the short events and in the last two weeks I ran my second fastest 100m time of the last four years at a small meeting in Poland.”

The man known as the Bladerunner will be in action for the first time on Saturday when he lines up for the 200m heats and hopefully goes through to Sunday’s final.

“I think the 200m is my favourite event, because as I said, I’ve moved away from the 100m but the 400m is also one long race. I’ll just be looking to get through the heats as comfortably as possible and then step up for the final. Hopefully I’ll be first out of the corner and have some high velocity with me. In Athens I broke the world record with my first 200m so that was a very enjoyable race and has good memories for me.”

Asked whether having to concentrate on both the Olympics and Paralympics would take some of the sting out of his performances, Pistorius was adamant that this would not be the case. “I’ve already had 22 races this year ÔÇô in essence we run from May to September so it doesn’t really matter. I needed to peak for the 400m and now I’ve just used the last two weeks to get stronger.”

And Pistorius is confident that these Games will be ground-breaking in many ways. “Athens were my first Game.. until the beginning of that year I didn’t know much about disabled sport and didn’t even know the guys on either side of me! I think the biggest crowd turn-out was 20,000 on the one Saturday┬á ÔÇô┬áthe rest of the days was maybe 7000 or so. Then Beijing had big crowds but the perception was still not great.

“In the last two to three years perception has shifted and I think this will be the most accessible Paralympics in regards to audience etc where the focus will not be on disability but ability. I think that these Games will change perceptions about not only athletes with disabilities but about all people with disabilities.”